Avalon Rural Settlement

Avalon Rural Settlement Facts

Commissioner Nicole Wilson is a licensed attorney who works in public interest and has helped individuals and non-profit environmental organizations navigate local, state and federal laws. Nicole believes that everyone has equal rights under the law and is committed to working on behalf of the underserved members of our community.

Nicole was born and raised in Gainesville Florida and moved to Central Florida over 20 years ago. Nicole received her bachelor’s degree in psychology and human services from Mercer University, and law degree from Barry University School of Law. Her legal studies included a concentration on environmental and earth law, and she gained practice experience in Barry Law’s Environmental and Earth Law Clinic and Advanced Clinic she went on to be named Associate Editor of the Environmental and Earth Law Journal and was awarded an Honors Certificate in Environmental and Earth Law.


What my district means to me

Being a Florida native, I have always treasured the natural beauty of Florida, which is why I decided to obtain a degree in environmental law. I aim to preserve the natural beauty of my home and hope that others who come to Florida will have the chance to do the same. 

My husband and I moved to District 1 over 20 years ago. We live in a place that encompasses vibrant metropolitan areas as well as natural corridors and open space. In my opinion, that is what our district is — a mesh of civilization and natural beauty. My goal as Commissioner is to champion for smart growth — balancing sustainable development of our economy while respecting the limits of our natural resources. 

Another aspect of my district that I treasure is the diversity in people. With differences in people’s race, ethnicity, language, gender identity, and income, I am challenged to make decisions that benefit all of those who reside here. Every day, I’m driven by the notion that I am working as an elected official for the people. The well-being of my constituents and all Orange County residents is a priority. I strive to be transparent, available and to listen to my constituents’ concerns; for without you, I would not be here. 

Bay Lake:

At the heart of our booming tourism industry, Lake Buena Vista is a municipality controlled by the Walt Disney Company. Beyond Disney’s gates, visitors can find everything from dining to shopping to nightlife and more. Restaurants with delectable cuisine from around the world and dinner theaters to delight young and old with shows, music, comedy, dancing and even medieval jousting are found in every corner. Several golf clubs are also located in this vacation hotspot making it an ideal destination for all families.

Lake Buena Vista:

At the heart of our booming tourism industry, Lake Buena Vista is a municipality controlled by the Walt Disney Company. Beyond Disney’s gates, visitors can find everything from dining to shopping to nightlife and more. Restaurants with delectable cuisine from around the world and dinner theaters to delight young and old with shows, music, comedy, dancing and even medieval jousting are found in every corner. Several golf clubs are also located in this vacation hotspot making it an ideal destination for all families.

Town of Oakland:


This gem of a town is surrounded by enormous moss-draped oak trees and is located on the southern shores of Lake Apopka. Incorporated in 1887, Oakland now has about 2,200 residents within its quiet, serene country atmosphere. Oakland is also home to the West Orange Trailhead and the Oakland Nature Preserve. The trailhead brings thousands of recreation seekers to the area annually, and the preserve provides them with the pristine beauty of Florida’s flora and fauna. A 700-student charter elementary school is Oakland’s most recent achievement, affording area residents with a choice in their children’s education.

Ocoee:

The settlement began when Dr. J. D. Starke led a group of slaves into the area in the mid-1850s. Many of the men, including Starke, were stricken with malaria and hoped by moving they could escape further outbreaks. They established a camp along the northern shores of a lake with open pine woods and found that the clear, clean water did indeed bring them better health. So Starke and his slaves worked in the fields near Lake Apopka during the day and retired to the warm, calm haven at night.

Orlando:

Windermere:

Windermere was bestowed its name from Dr. Stanley Scott, whose father purchased 160 acres in this picturesque location in 1885. Dr. Scott built his home on the shore of Lake Butler, and it is believed by many that he named this town after England’s famous Lake Windermere.

Today, more than 2,300 people inhabit the Town of Windermere, but the town’s focus is on preserving its natural history and strong community atmosphere. In fact, many of the town streets remain unpaved to continue their commitment to retain the pristine nature of the Chain of Lakes. Windermere has been named “Tree City USA” for its commitment to a natural environment for 10 consecutive years.

Winter Garden:

Often referred to as a modern-day Mayberry by its residents, Winter Garden is a city that exudes warmth and energy, with a down-home charm that makes everyone feel comfortable. It is a place for growing families and businesses, a place to relax and unwind and is a forward-thinking community that embraces new ideas and people.

Stroll down West Plant Street in the Historic Downtown District and be a part of the renaissance of a warm, vibrant community. Art studios and live theatre, bicycle stores, eclectic shops and a wide range of award-winning restaurants flank the West Orange Trail. It also features year-round cultural events, museums and the West Orange Trail system, which offers biking, walking, hiking and equestrian trails.